Disney

Disney's Auto Shop Top Tips

59 posts in this topic

Not that I know of. Our ESM is pretty detailed as it is. If they can't figure that out, we have a bunch of ASE Master techs here that field emails and phone calls from the field and they walk them through it.

Ashley P likes this

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The one benefit that I get from something like the 6.0 oil cooler vid is the ability to fast forward or pause/rewind for clarification.  When that ability is at the tech's fingertips it's wonderful.  Walking through on a phone call is a distant second, IMO.

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Posted (edited)

On 5/1/2018 at 9:46 AM, Disney said:

Top Tip: You're not as smart as you think you are. There's a lot to be learned, young buck. Even though you aren't in school, you should always seek out more education. Where do we do that these days? Youtube! Find people that are smart and know more than you do on a subject you are interested in, and learn.

Some of my personal favorites.....

https://www.youtube.com/user/dgelbart/videos

https://www.youtube.com/user/mrpete222/videos

https://www.youtube.com/user/BanjoBen1/videos

Wow, that D.Gelbart guy!  I've watched two vids, the first was the 1 micron accuracy lathe/mill/grinder thing and I figured he was a tad too accurate for me, but then I watched the 1870 Pratt & Whittney metal lathe...there's hope.  Wow, neat stuff.

Well, watched another..."non metal prototype materials".  Poor guy....he didn't mention the ONLY prototype material needed, cardboard!  lol

Edited by Ashley P

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Posted (edited)

Today I needed to hold a timing chain in position:  a partial roll of electrical tape did the job. 

(By folding the roll between the housing and chain...not using 24 feet of tape..)

Edited by Ashley P

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Reminds me....

 

TOP TIP!!!  When replacing a timing belt on an OHC or DOHC engine use this trick to same time.

cut original belt in half while on the engine by cutting into the belt (lengthwise) while rotating the engine. 

Once you have it cut all the way around, then slip off the outer half of the old belt.

Now, start working on the new belt and push it on as you rotate the engine pushing it on all the pulleys as you rotate.

Once you've got it to where it meets up with the old belt, then cut the old belt off and keep pushing the new belt on.

BAM. you're welcome.

Ashley P and 66sprint6 like this

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Disney, you also said that a long handle ratchet is the way to go.  I added a cheap 22" long 1/2 ratchet to my cart and ditched my breaker bar.  Mucho handio.

Disney likes this

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Ya'll may not need this, but be aware there is a black light dye for oil/fluids.  Finding an oil leak after oil is spread all over an engine is sometimes a pain, but a $6 dye treatment will show in short order EXACTLY where the leak originates.   A customer yesterday wanted a rear main, but in 5 minutes dye showed the sender was leaking.

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You know how valve stem seals have little guards to keep the valve keeper grooves from damaging them on install?  Well, I needed to remove the valves from brand new assembled heads and didn't want to damage the seals...I found that when the seals were about 30 degrees they were so stiff that a valve could be jerked out before the seal could grab it.

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On 5/1/2018 at 9:46 AM, Disney said:

Top Tip: You're not as smart as you think you are. There's a lot to be learned, young buck.

I was thinking about this today.  I installed my X hundredth  Chevy 6.5 diesel injection pump.  "Book" and "teachers" taught me to bleed the system by cracking lines at injectors and cranking over and over until fuel leaks, then tighten and it might start/run.

Today before bolting the pump down, I connected the fuel supply and all wiring, then spun the pump with a drill.  The ECM thought the engine was turning so the pump started pumping fuel after several revolutions.  I installed the pump and the engine fired up almost as easily as it would on a cool day.

Moral:  Ruts are easy to get stuck in, try to keep your mind flexible.

mstrpth and Disney like this

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