Disney

Disney's Auto Shop Top Tips

59 posts in this topic

It occurred to me the other day that i've accumulated a decent bit of auto and general garage knowledge. Some of those tid bits come to me naturally and I realized that they may not occur to other folks, or they have never heard of said tid bit. I thought it might be helpful to introduce some of those things here in case folks have never heard of them. So, feel free to participate and try out the tips I give. If you have a better way, please let me know!

 

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TOP TIP #1.

0000 steel wool, commonly found in hardware, paint, and supply stores. Is the absolute best window cleaner I've ever found and that you can buy. The fine steel wool will leave your windows cleaner than any commercially available cleaner ever though about short of using an abrasive polisher. It's cheap and wildy effective. 

My Process:

  1. Clean glass with window cleaner and cloth to remove big chunks, oils, etc. 
  2. Use full piece of 0000 Steel wool in a circular motion all over the glass. Use light reflections to make sure you're getting all the grimey spots
  3. Keep cleaning glass and turning the steel wool over until it glides effortlessly across the glass.
  4. Clean glass again with glass cleaner and a lint free towel, or even better... NEWSPAPER.
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26 minutes ago, dr.art said:

TIP # 3

 

the best way to remove the smell of gasoline and oils etc from your hands is Listerine mouth wash 

Wash your hands with it smell and fumes are gone

 

Toothpaste also works and is good to get really hard to get grime off.

Toothpaste is also amazing for burns.  Lather it on IMMEDIATELY and go back to work.  Whenever you get around to it, rinse is off and your good to go.  I dont know how many times ive done this and it knocks a wicked burn down to no big deal and helps take the sting out.

Matt

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38 minutes ago, 66sprint6 said:

Toothpaste is also amazing for burns.  Lather it on IMMEDIATELY and go back to work.  Whenever you get around to it, rinse is off and your good to go.  I dont know how many times ive done this and it knocks a wicked burn down to no big deal and helps take the sting out.

Matt

First i've heard of that! I will try it next time I unfortunately get a burn. 

For burns I've been putting honey on the burn. Just pour it on, cover the wound, and go back to work. 

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I was at one of my clients restaurants (when I was younger) and one of the cooks burned himself and we overheard the owner hollering to get the toothpaste out of the first aid kit.  Asked him what that was all about and he told us, been doing it ever since.  Sometimes the burn is bad enough that there is no helping it, but most of the time it does the trick.  Ive had burns that turned white instantly, tossed toothpaste on it immediately and it didnt even blister.  Ive read some things that say its NOT good to put toothpaste on it but I go by what Ive experienced over the interwebs most of the time anyways LOL

Matt

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To take out the slack on a floor jack or cherry picker, don't stoke the handle,  just raise the pad or hook by hand:  the cylinder will extend and hold (on most makes).  And if you've jacked up one side and want to raise the other, lower the jack flat and push it under the car instead of dragging it around the car.

EGT can show a misfiring cylinder, so a squirt of water on an exhaust manifold/header tube can tell much.  The same squirt bottle is handy when torching stuff...just in case.  Almost always effective and free compared to an extinguisher.  And it rinses brake fluid away.

To diagnose a power window that won't work, attempt to operate it while watching the dome light.  A dimming bulb indicates current flow, and if the motor isn't moving it's bad.

In a pinch, a deep well socket and extension slipped over a ratchet handle makes a longer handle.

Sometimes I've masked off areas by using wet newspaper instead of tape.

Pulling a hood by myself, I use cardboard boxes near the hinge area to help catch it/protect the windshield.

The older I get the more often my safety glasses are actually on my eyes and not up in my hair.  I flushed my eyes with aerosol carb cleaner 2.5 years ago and as Jerry Reed would say....SON!

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9 hours ago, Ashley P said:

I flushed my eyes with aerosol carb cleaner 2.5 years ago and as Jerry Reed would say....SON!

Non-cloro brake cleaner here.  Nothing like hooking up a hose to flush your eyes when you can't see anything and doing everything by feel and memory.

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11 hours ago, Ashley P said:

To take out the slack on a floor jack or cherry picker, don't stoke the handle,  just raise the pad or hook by hand:  the cylinder will extend and hold (on most makes).  And if you've jacked up one side and want to raise the other, lower the jack flat and push it under the car instead of dragging it around the car.

EGT can show a misfiring cylinder, so a squirt of water on an exhaust manifold/header tube can tell much.  The same squirt bottle is handy when torching stuff...just in case.  Almost always effective and free compared to an extinguisher.  And it rinses brake fluid away.

To diagnose a power window that won't work, attempt to operate it while watching the dome light.  A dimming bulb indicates current flow, and if the motor isn't moving it's bad.

In a pinch, a deep well socket and extension slipped over a ratchet handle makes a longer handle.

Sometimes I've masked off areas by using wet newspaper instead of tape.

Pulling a hood by myself, I use cardboard boxes near the hinge area to help catch it/protect the windshield.

The older I get the more often my safety glasses are actually on my eyes and not up in my hair.  I flushed my eyes with aerosol carb cleaner 2.5 years ago and as Jerry Reed would say....SON!

Clearly you need your own thread of Shop tips.

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Tip:  ask permission from Disney to participate in his thread.  lol

Don't forget to check and replace your shop air compressor air filter.  I don't run mine often nor in a very dirty area, so I neglected checking the foam filter.  Many years later I looked at it and it was gone.  Crumbed into pieces and pumped.  Total defeat of the purpose.  I fitted a car air filter to it.

I add molybdenum disulfide to the compressor oil, all small engines without oil filter, and diffs that don't have posi.  It'll clog an oil filter, so don't do that.

I use Ford grease tubes that are moly fortified.

The copper alloy brake lines we have are great for bending without kinking.  I adapted a 3' length to a cheap air gun to make blowing out spark plug tubes and head bolt holes much easier.

Edited by Ashley P
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Top Tip #4.

Copper tubing can get work hardened if you bend it too much making it to where it won't bend anymore in that location. Tubing, wire, etc can all suffer from this. To fix that, you use a process called Annealing. Just heat the copper up to (a lot) about 700*F then let it cool back down. The area that had previously taken a set can now be moved again. 

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On ‎2‎/‎9‎/‎2018 at 2:49 PM, Disney said:

Top Tip #4.

Copper tubing can get work hardened if you bend it too much making it to where it won't bend anymore in that location. Tubing, wire, etc can all suffer from this. To fix that, you use a process called Annealing. Just heat the copper up to (a lot) about 700*F then let it cool back down. The area that had previously taken a set can now be moved again. 

I love watching this guy. He talks about this process around the 6:20 mark up to about 10 min or so.

 

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To remove a stuck paper gasket, tap on it with a hammer. 

To keep gaskets from sticking, grease them.  Works well on carburetor gaskets.

Edited by Ashley P

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DONT use red shop rags when wiping down ANYTHING internal or that can lead to the internals of a motor (insert embarrassed face) :lol:

Wookie.jpg

Only thing that makes me feel better is finding the cracked oil pump (apparently a known issue with newer Melling M68 oil pumps) before it decides to take the motor down with it.  Oh and reading about the poor dude that left a red rag in the oil pan and found it wrapped around the cam after firing up.  

Matt

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^ I know someone who was working on a 6.0 diesel and put a shop rag into the intercooler to keep trash out....yet forgot to remove it and fed it to the turbo.   Thankfully the engine was running so bad that it just slowly ground it into lint which insulated the intercooler...a good cleaning and set of injectors later and the truck was good. Crap happens, just make sure to learn from it.

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1 hour ago, 66sprint6 said:

 

Only thing that makes me feel better is finding the cracked oil pump (apparently a known issue with newer Melling M68 oil pumps) before it decides to take the motor down with it. 

Cracked oil pump? Do tell. I haven't heard of that.

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The new Melling pumps apparently are cast from a different material than earlier models and are thinner/lighter so they are prone to cracking.  Mostly where the pickup tube bolts to the pump, and thats where mine cracked as well.  Thats what I read at least after looking into it last night.  I got a new one and will be paying particular attention when installing it.  Guy behind the counter said to keep the box and bring it back if it cracks and hell give me another to try.

Matt

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When I replaced the ball joints on my daily driver the wheels were way out of alignment.  Wanting to get it close, I moistened the tread and rolled it across smooth concrete and judged by the contact pattern how to adjust.  It was good enough for me to drive it for about 10 years afterward.

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Serpentine belts are useful, they can be used as slings or pads for jacks so as not to scratch the undercarriage.  Just cut the belt and roll it up, put a screw into it to keep it rolled up.  

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1 quart Havoline oil bottles are threaded the same as a lot of oil fill necks (most all Fords, some others).  Makes a cheap funnel that threads in.

Another serp belt trick, I use 'em for looped handles on wooden chock blocks.

Edited by Ashley P
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