slim_9916

Smokers

111 posts in this topic

5 hours ago, mstrpth said:

so how do you keep the cuts from drying out?

I'm new to all of this so yeah..... :lol: 

Water pan will keep stuff from drying out. Briskets have a large fat cap that help to keep it from drying out as the fat renders off. Now you can dry one out pretty easily but as long as you watch your temps you'll be ok. If you ever smoke a brisket I'll give you a few things I typically do. Just be prepared for a long smoke and make sure you have plenty of time because there is no rushing a brisket.

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2 minutes ago, mstrpth said:

what temp do you usually cook chicken at?

Around 180 is good for chicken. I've only done wings and I've yet to master those. At least when I compare to them to slick pig wings. It's all about the bite through skin when it comes to chicken for me. I smoked the wings for a couple of hours then finished them on the grill and all my skin just peeled off of them when the grill heat hit them. :lol:  I read that was one method for crispy skin but it did not work for me at all. A lot of it is trial and error and what you prefer at the end of the day. 

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6 hours ago, mstrpth said:

so how do you keep the cuts from drying out?

A pan of water and...don't fan the door! :)     Keep that humidity inside the cooker...

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6 hours ago, mstrpth said:

so how do you keep the cuts from drying out?

I'm new to all of this so yeah..... :lol: 

Get to the bbq restaurant early.  Yeah, that smoking stuff is a lot of hastle and never as good as the local bbq joint.  I love my grill, but never could get what I wanted from a smoker.

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17 minutes ago, Mike said:

Get to the bbq restaurant early.  Yeah, that smoking stuff is a lot of hastle and never as good as the local bbq joint.  I love my grill, but never could get what I wanted from a smoker.

 Almost every time I order brisket somewhere I am disappointed with exception to a few places.

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I threw out my chip and water pan. I use an 8" cast iron skillet over the burner and a 9x13 cake pan on the bottom rack for water/liquids. 

I think i'm getting pretty good at my Chicken now. Seems to always turn out good (to me). I smoke wings at 225*. I smoke brisket down around 180*

If you don't have one yet, get a good 3" thermostat. The factory installed ones are junk. Here's what i'm using....

http://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/old-country-bbq-pits-smoker-and-grill-3-temperature-gauge?repChildCatid=372602

10168110.jpg?is=640,640

 

And get a remote meat thermometer.

 

http://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/acurite-digital-cooking-thermometer-with-probe?repChildCatid=943638

10304541.jpg

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I'm just using the factory thermostat. After a few hours it fogs up and is pretty much useless at that point.

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This one mod alone will really help your smoking.

 

Another thing I did was used some silicone weatherstrip to seal the doors up. Keeps more smoke in!

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4 minutes ago, Disney said:

This one mod alone will really help your smoking.

 

Another thing I did was used some silicone weatherstrip to seal the doors up. Keeps more smoke in!

I don't have that issue yet. i'll keep that in mind as it gets good and broke in though.

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2 hours ago, ts1979flh said:

That's a hoss right there!!:cheers:

I'd rock it though. :yes: 

I grill for 5 people most of the time and I like to grill enough to have 2 or 3 days worth of leftovers. :yum: 

 

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Smoke a whole turkey....how?   (It came in a bag, so the killin'/pluckin' is already done.)

Edited by Ashley P

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Speaking of venison, a guy made a crock-pot of deer stew/soup. Man that stuff was good. :yum:

It is making me regret selling my deer rifle. I might have to get back in to hunting now! :lol:

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Deer rifle?  What's wrong with any of your other rifles??  Take the muzzle brake off the one and it's concussion will kill a deer...while tenderizing the meat! lol

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Any smoke lately?  I used apple wood from storm damage and smoked some ribs yesterday.   Smoked 'em hard for about 3 hrs uncovered with only some butter/salt/Kraft original BBQ sauce spread on them.   Then covered for 2 hrs with butter and more sauce.  All near 215*.   Then brushed off, more sauce, uncovered for 45 minutes at 275.   Ended up more smoky than I wanted and not as tender as I want.   Next time = less smoke, more cover, more heat/and or time.

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I cooked some ribs yesterday also with a pan of charcoal on my gas grill.  A few hickory chips thrown in for flavor.  There’s no way to control airflow on a gas grill, so it cooked hot.  2 hours uncovered and 1 wrapped in foil.  No sauce and they were pretty good.  I’m definitely looking into a real smoker.

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I'm interested in what "smoking" means. 

1) A couple/few generations ago, a smokehouse was a room where uncooked meats hung with enough smoke to keep insects out.   Salted and smoked meat could hang for years at room temperature.

2) Locally, BBQ competitors use hickory charcoal/embers to heat the ribs, which are usually wrapped tightly with seasoning.  I don't know how much smoke is emitted from the cooker.

3) Smokers like I have, they simply put smoke in the air to flavor the meat.  But the smoke is from the direct burning of the wood, not from the nearly smokeless burning of charcoal or embers.  It think direct burning of the wood allows more of the putrid creosote smell. 

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What I gather from my YouTube training.  You want hazy blue “smoke”.  The thick white smoke gives that overpowering bitter taste.  

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