Ashley P

Any gardeners?

103 posts in this topic

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My lil helper helpin with potatoes

846ed8e3cc7b476d3aa2aff1a0a4db14.jpg got It all planted just in time for the rain to start sprinkling. I added a lil trench after pic to divert rain.

Potatoes, Watermelon , peachs and cream corn, cantaloupe, okra, onions, radish,

Just lack tomatoes and few peppers now. I did a big plot to give stuff space and to cut down on mowing

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Mine are kicking butt also.  Most things I planted from pre grown stuff from Bates Nursery.  Cucumbers, green onion, carrots, jalapeno, onion and potatoes were grown from seed or seed plants (potato and onion).

 

Here is the cucumber after almost 2 weeks.  I pulled all but 3 sprouts from each hill.

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And the potatoes.  I swear the one closest tripled overnight.

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Overall.  The tomatoes are to the right in another bed.  They are doing ok, not impressive.

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I've been getting a fair amount of vegetables from the garden.  The potato plants were looking rough a week ago so I pulled them and got about 4 lbs of potatoes.  I just pulled the carrots to go in a pot roast tomorrow.  We've been eating tomatoes for a couple weeks and so have the squirrels.  As soon as they ripen, the squirrels dig in, so I've been pulling them a little early.  I've learned that one cucumber plant is plenty.  My zucchini and squash plants never developed female flowers, so nothing from them.  The bell peppers have a couple peppers but they are slow going.  There are two decent looking onions and a few green onions.  I'm sick of basil.  My napa cabbage has never developed a "head" of cabage, just lots of loose leaves.

We put in some sweet potatoes and pumpkin a couple weeks ago and they are flourishing.

Next year I'll till and get the dirt loosened up deeper and spread the plants out a little more.  I'll also just grow everything from seed next year.  All the pre grown stuff flopped except the tomatoes.

 

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Does anyone have a recommendation for a winter cover crop?  

I'm thinking about some kind of climbing plant to make use of the fence next year, but no idea what.

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I think I posted on here somewhere. we started all of our seeds inside under grow lights. when it was warm enough, we moved them out. Everything we planted produced. seeds are def the way to go. 

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On 7/12/2016 at 0:44 PM, mstrpth said:

I think I posted on here somewhere. we started all of our seeds inside under grow lights. when it was warm enough, we moved them out. Everything we planted produced. seeds are def the way to go. 

Pics? :love:

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Mike, I'm a little late:embarrassed:, but those carrots look good.  My extension office booklet lists some cover crops, clover and winter wheat/rye are two that I recall.

Anybody gardening this year?   I hauled about 10 cu yds of compost into our garden, then plowed it under and disked it in.  I've gardened there about 5 of the last 8 years without ever seriously adding any nutrients/ect, so I figured it was time.   Planted about 18 tomato plants, a few squash, 5 - 20' rows of corn for starters.  Attempting to put plastic down between corn rows since I had some left over from house construction.  Putting cardboard down around tomatoes before caging them.  While I had the plow/disk I also broke ground more a hunting spot in the hopes of planting some sunflowers and "heirloom" corn there.  Since every neighboring farm is in beans this year I hope to attract some deer/turkeys with that plot.

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I didn't have time to set up a garden area so we're just growing in pots this year. picked up 15 or so tomato plants and a few jalapeno's. also picked up a rain catcher. got that set up last night under a downspout.  

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I have three soil types:  raised bed that's 90% new compost, garden area that's 50/50 compost/plowed ground, and an area only plowed ground. 

Raised bed tomatoes are Rutgers and look like bushes, very thick with leaf growth.  The "only plowed ground" Rutgers tomatoes look like sticks, stunted and sickly.  The compost stuff kicks butt.

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agreed.

we have probably 20 or so tomatoes that are golf ball sized.

This is our first year planting Cherokee purple tomatoes. Pretty excited about those given they are the BEST tomatoes you will ever eat.

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On ‎6‎/‎13‎/‎2018 at 6:37 AM, mstrpth said:

agreed.

we have probably 20 or so tomatoes that are golf ball sized.

This is our first year planting Cherokee purple tomatoes. Pretty excited about those given they are the BEST tomatoes you will ever eat.

I've got five Cherokee Purples planted.  They taste great.  I've got one that's about ripe that will probably cover a slice of bread when it's sliced.

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1 hour ago, Ashley P said:

Well, what's so special 'bout them Cherokee Purples?

To me, they are less acidic and have a sweeter taste.  Everyone I've gave some to in the past said it's the best tasting tomato they've had. 

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18 minutes ago, ts1979flh said:

To me, they are less acidic and have a sweeter taste.  Everyone I've gave some to in the past said it's the best tasting tomato they've had. 

I'll be the judge of that.

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If you can find them, give them a try.  I believe you will like them.  A lady at our local farmer's market last year was selling them for something like $4-$5 per lb.  She said she sold every one she had. 

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On 6/13/2018 at 10:26 AM, Disney said:

Love compost maters. Love manure maters even more. Put some cow poop in there and till it in... MMmMMmmM

My compost comes from next door to the sewage treatment plant.  I hear the compost has "solids" added from there.  Does that make it "humanure"?

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17 hours ago, Ashley P said:

My compost comes from next door to the sewage treatment plant.  I hear the compost has "solids" added from there.  Does that make it "humanure"?

 No.  You work at a place next door to another business where a guy that works there has a running GTO. Does that make your car ready to race this weekend?

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