Ashley P

Homeschooling

47 posts in this topic

Boy, girl, boy, boy...so far.


 


The girl listened to the boy being taught to read, and she picked it up with no training.  Homeschool FTW!


 


John C, thanks for the O2 lesson.


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How do your kids do socially? We have talked about home school, but don't know how kids do without that daily interaction with friends. I'm a weird introverted engineer, so I'm not looking for my kid to be a social butterfly.

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How do your kids do socially? We have talked about home school, but don't know how kids do without that daily interaction with friends. I'm a weird introverted engineer, so I'm not looking for my kid to be a social butterfly.

 

we're part of a co-op group of homeschoolers that meet once a week. gives em a couple hours to play and usually has a speaker there(dentist, doctors, police, etc..)

My daughter was a very shy kid so we put her in a very parent friendly Christian pre school. It really helped her. We've also done things like gymnastics, soccer, etc.

 

FYI - Homeschooling is no joke. it takes months of research to find the right curriculum and umbrella school (if you want to do it right). I would do it all over again the same way.

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How do your kids do socially? We have talked about home school, but don't know how kids do without that daily interaction with friends. I'm a weird introverted engineer, so I'm not looking for my kid to be a social butterfly.

That's the #1 question that is asked of homeschool families.  My response is that homeschooled children have the opportunity to become MUCH more socially adept than public schooled children.  The reason is that public school puts children of a narrow age group together but homeschooling (and co-op groups) usually intermix multiple age groups together.   My observations are that public school children have a very difficult time interacting with ANY age group other than their own; they won't even play with other age groups.  Homeschooled children can carry on a conversation with their peers, younger children, and even adults.  They are great at including younger children in play.

 

And public school has turned into, largely, a giant social event.  Figure out what percentage of the school day is used for learning vs. how much is consumed with other activities.  A homeschool day lasts about 2.5 hours (for a 2nd grader and 1st grader).  Locally there are some buses that are on the road that long to and from the new school.

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That's the #1 question that is asked of homeschool families.  My response is that homeschooled children have the opportunity to become MUCH more socially adept than public schooled children.  The reason is that public school puts children of a narrow age group together but homeschooling (and co-op groups) usually intermix multiple age groups together.   My observations are that public school children have a very difficult time interacting with ANY age group other than their own; they won't even play with other age groups.  Homeschooled children can carry on a conversation with their peers, younger children, and even adults.  They are great at including younger children in play.

 

And public school has turned into, largely, a giant social event.  Figure out what percentage of the school day is used for learning vs. how much is consumed with other activities.  A homeschool day lasts about 2.5 hours (for a 2nd grader and 1st grader).  Locally there are some buses that are on the road that long to and from the new school.

 

I agree 100% not to mention that 2.5 hours is one on one time

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My wife will be glad to hear all this. We just have to find a group of other kids somewhere for her to mingle with.  My mom is a 5th grade teacher, and the stories she tells makes me never want to send my kids to public school.  I think even she thinks the home schooling is better.  I don't remember it being that bad when i was young, either times have changed or I was oblivious when I was young.


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My kids wont be homeschooled cause only half the teachers at that school have a brain worth a flip and the other half...are idiots...you can figure out whos who  :winkgrin:   Now, if I could be in charge of recess, lunch and shop class Ide be down!!!


 


Look forward to havin kids, there will be alot of praying and preparing due to some issues that could arise but we are optimistic and also willing to go with God's will.  He's done amazing things for us so far and also helped strengthen us both in times when things were less than amazing, or down right amazingly terrible.  No reason to think the same wont apply with this chapter in our lives.


 


Matt


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My kids wont be homeschooled cause only half the teachers at that school have a brain worth a flip and the other half...are idiots...you can figure out whos who  :winkgrin:   Now, if I could be in charge of recess, lunch and shop class Ide be down!!!

 

Matt

Are you ASSUMING the local public school is any better?  :)

 

Mike:  you mentioned your mother having doubts about public school.  I have a very good friend of mine who is a very educated public school teacher, I think his specialty is working with students who struggle with speech.  He and his wife homeschool. He tells me what happens in that local elementary school that are terrible.

Edited by Ashley P

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Are you ASSUMING the local public school is any better?  :)

 

Mike:  you mentioned your mother having doubts about public school.  I have a very good friend of mine who is a very educated public school teacher, I think his specialty is working with students who struggle with speech.  He and his wife homeschool. He tells me what happens in that local elementary school that are terrible.

 

Im not ASSuming anything, I know Im not the one to teach my kids EVERYTHING they need to know school wise.  I will be able to help them, sure, and teach em life stuff but if it was up to me to teach em everything they are supposed to learn in school then they are screwed.  My wife on the other hand is a genious (she doesnt read these forums so Im safe to say it) and could teach em Im sure.  Ive got nothin against homeschooling, just isnt on our radar at the moment.  Never know tho, when we actually get to that bridge we will worry about crossing it then.  Plus, we both work and plan to keep it that way...unless that is Kathleen keeps moving up, hits it rich and I can retire early.  Hey, just sayin it would be cool!

 

Matt

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Im not ASSuming anything, I know Im not the one to teach my kids EVERYTHING they need to know school wise. I will be able to help them, sure, and teach em life stuff but if it was up to me to teach em everything they are supposed to learn in school then they are screwed. My wife on the other hand is a genious (she doesnt read these forums so Im safe to say it) and could teach em Im sure. Ive got nothin against homeschooling, just isnt on our radar at the moment. Never know tho, when we actually get to that bridge we will worry about crossing it then. Plus, we both work and plan to keep it that way...unless that is Kathleen keeps moving up, hits it rich and I can retire early. Hey, just sayin it would be cool!

Matt

They're not educating kids right now (common core math, socialism studies, political correctness, pseudo science global warming, etc).

I just can't detail it all here, but if you go public education, better read your kids books and be ready to pick out the propaganda and explain to your kids the rights and wrongs while still making sure they comply and answer how the school wants so they can pass.

History class now is garbage in public school, too.

Lawyer friend of mine said if you don't pay now, you will pay later when it comes to your kids education.

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Have you ever heard of Voddie Baucham?  He's a proponent of homeschooling.   He quotes stats (from where I don't know) that inner city black students who are homeschooled test in the 75th percentile vs. 25th for other black inner city school students.  (Those stats from memory, which I don't have....).


 


I'm glad you are keeping options on the table.  Be careful not to limit your abilities on teaching.  If you know how to arc weld you probably can explain lots of the science behind electricity, thermal transfer, ect.  Back in high school chemistry I didn't learn much at all.  But 6 years later I was dealing with Boyle's law and the ideal gas law when figuring engine airflow when super/turbocharged.  And balancing chemical equations was over my head...if only the teacher had put it in terms I could understand and said "when burning 1 pound of 90% nitromethane at a mixture to produce maximum hp, how many pounds of air will be needed".


 


That's what homeschool is about.  It allows the home educator to use the interests of the child against them...uh, FOR them.  :winkgrin:


 


And, mastery of each subject before moving to the next.  If I had mastered algebra in 8th grade instead of just getting by...I suppose I would have had an easier time in Algebra II and PreCalc.


 


My wife gave up her job(s) to stay at home and whip, uh, I mean TRAIN our kids.  It was a sacrifice.


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and if that fails you can order curriculum that tells you how to teach. even gives you word for word instructions. we use it, but it's mainly for a guidline 


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Have you ever heard of Voddie Baucham?  He's a proponent of homeschooling.   He quotes stats (from where I don't know) that inner city black students who are homeschooled test in the 75th percentile vs. 25th for other black inner city school students.  (Those stats from memory, which I don't have....).

 

I'm glad you are keeping options on the table.  Be careful not to limit your abilities on teaching.  If you know how to arc weld you probably can explain lots of the science behind electricity, thermal transfer, ect.  Back in high school chemistry I didn't learn much at all.  But 6 years later I was dealing with Boyle's law and the ideal gas law when figuring engine airflow when super/turbocharged.  And balancing chemical equations was over my head...if only the teacher had put it in terms I could understand and said "when burning 1 pound of 90% nitromethane at a mixture to produce maximum hp, how many pounds of air will be needed".

 

That's what homeschool is about.  It allows the home educator to use the interests of the child against them...uh, FOR them.  :winkgrin:

 

And, mastery of each subject before moving to the next.  If I had mastered algebra in 8th grade instead of just getting by...I suppose I would have had an easier time in Algebra II and PreCalc.

 

My wife gave up her job(s) to stay at home and whip, uh, I mean TRAIN our kids.  It was a sacrifice.

 

This statement does not really seem apply to TN unless you live in certain downtown areas of Nashville, Chatt, Memphis and maybe Knoxville. I was public school educated and can't imagine it any other way. My high school had around 2500 kids, some from the projects, some from the country, and everybody else in between. It's hard for me to believe home schooling can ever expose kids to all of the walks of life you will encounter on a day to day basis as adult. Some teachers are good, some are bad just like every other profession. My question is: How do you eliminate personal bias from material you don't agree with? Or you do choose to not present said material?

 

disclaimer: I hesitate to comment on this and have no kids but they will likely be in public schools. Oh and my mom retired from Murfreesboro City Schools after over 30 years and while she had problem kids, she never complained or did it for any other reason than the kids. What about sports? Sports were integral in my youth and I know they have a system setup for homeschool kids but let's face it,  anything after elementary school and any decent sized school will crush them. That't not fun for anybody. I just think you miss out on so many life lessons, "Dad, why didn't I make the team?" My opinion may change for now that's where I'm at.

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I felt the same as you until I had kids. and once I started hearing stories of this kid being molested and that kid and so forth while at school, that was the deciding factor for me. I can't speak for all, but I believe almost everything has a certain standard or a starting point and then you draw your personal bias from that point. I know that I can teach my kids up to that point and then let them believe and go the way that they see and understand it.


 


as I parent I do influence my kids but believe me, they form their own opinions and usually side with them. I'll admit, I teach my kids what I think is right and whats wrong. I could care less about the rest of society. I believe that's how any good parent does it.


 


side note - I went to public school all my life in a small town. I now work primarily in the projects. what I was taught at school didn't and couldn't have prepared me for that. Knowing whats right and wrong, and having respect for people did - which I learned from my parents...


 


</endrant>


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This statement does not really seem apply to TN unless you live in certain downtown areas of Nashville, Chatt, Memphis and maybe Knoxville. I was public school educated and can't imagine it any other way. My high school had around 2500 kids, some from the projects, some from the country, and everybody else in between. It's hard for me to believe home schooling can ever expose kids to all of the walks of life you will encounter on a day to day basis as adult. Some teachers are good, some are bad just like every other profession. My question is: How do you eliminate personal bias from material you don't agree with? Or you do choose to not present said material?

 

disclaimer: I hesitate to comment on this and have no kids but they will likely be in public schools. Oh and my mom retired from Murfreesboro City Schools after over 30 years and while she had problem kids, she never complained or did it for any other reason than the kids. What about sports? Sports were integral in my youth and I know they have a system setup for homeschool kids but let's face it,  anything after elementary school and any decent sized school will crush them. That't not fun for anybody. I just think you miss out on so many life lessons, "Dad, why didn't I make the team?" My opinion may change for now that's where I'm at.

I want to accurately address your comments.  Can you clarify your first sentence....what "statement does not really seem to apply...."?

 

On exposure to "all walks of life"..would you want your child "exposed to all walks of life" in an environment away from your supervision?

 

You ask "how do you eliminate personal bias from material I don't agree with?".  Well, I don't present material I don't believe in, that's what public schools do, IMO.

 

About sports.  (I grew up loving basketball, FWIW).  We have a homeschool "field day" annually.  There is an association playing football, too.  But whether you are a school of 20 kids, or a school of 2000 kids, the same situation arises:  the more likely it is for the average student to "make the team" the more likely it is for that team to be beaten.  Sports have turned into a HUGE distraction from the educational system in the past several decades in the USA.   Fred Schwarz spoke against communism in many places, he told once...

 

I was visiting an American college. Before I had been there ten minutes, the president told me with great pride of a young man who had brought glory and honor to their school. Wherever I went on the campus, I heard his praises sung. At last I met him, and a fine young man he was. His body was lithe and slender, and he stood some six, feet two inches tall. He was their leading basketball player. His skill at the game was so great that he had been chosen to go to Melbourne, Australia, to represent the United States in the Olympic Games in 1956. What an honor for the school! Frequently I asked, "Who is your leading science student?" He looked at me in wonder and amazement. He could not answer the question. To find out information like that a careful study of the records would be required. I want to make it quite clear that I have nothing against basketball. I think it is a splendid sport. The ability to project accurately an inflated spherical ball through an iron hoop is a remarkable gift indeed. However, it is difficult to envisage how ballistic missiles can be effectively stopped with basketballs. Faced as we are with a struggle for survival against an enemy who spares no effort to educate the young in those fields which will help to secure victory, it would seem that the scale of values in the American educational system might well be revised.

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I grew up in Metro Schools and I have a lot of issues with public schools because of it.  The bias I learned from going to those schools and interacting with other "students" probably can't be taught by a parent.


 


In my Mom's 5th grade class in a Sumner county  school, it seems as though half the kids have adhd or some other disorder.  Kids that used to get used to just be bad kids, are now "disciplinary deficient" or some other BS fake disorder.  Once it becomes a "medical condition" they are off limits to teacher/ principle discipline.  It's absolutely ridiculous.  And a lot of parents now flat out suck.  Some 5th graders have to get them selves up and ready for school in the morning with no parental help becuase their parents are sleeping off a hangover.  My mom says she spends the majority of the day dealing with the special needs (bad) kids in the class and the smartest (or hardest workers) are neglected.  No thanks.  School isn't school anymore it's babysitting.  And as for sports, I think there are better things to occupy a kids time, but that's a completely different rant for me.  Every boy in elementary school is going to be a pro athlete when he grows up these days.


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Mike, regarding ADHD or some other disorder, many studies find that the public school method of "sit down and read/listen" does not work nearly as well for boys as girls.  There are many differences in how the average girl and average boy tend to learn, and wouldn't you know it, public schools tend to lean heavily in favor of teaching to the girls.


 


Don't get me wrong, I admire teachers.  Public school doesn't fail every time.  Shoot, that's where learned speling, tieping, and grammer use.


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Mike, regarding ADHD or some other disorder, many studies find that the public school method of "sit down and read/listen" does not work nearly as well for boys as girls.  There are many differences in how the average girl and average boy tend to learn, and wouldn't you know it, public schools tend to lean heavily in favor of teaching to the girls.

 

Don't get me wrong, I admire teachers.  Public school doesn't fail every time.  Shoot, that's where learned speling, tieping, and grammer use.

 

I agree there are other ways.  Not every kid learns the same way.  I think if a kid excels at something they should concentrate on that, kinda like how college works.  A kid that can do calculus in 9th grade probably shouldn't have 4 years of English literature.

 

As far as disorders.  It's an epidemic now, but it wasn't when I was in school.  If you yelled out in class or didn't pay attention to the teacher, there were consequences.  Now, you have a disorder and it's ok to do it every day.  Back then the principle spanked you and when you got home your parents dealt with you.  The next day, you didn't do it.

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I agree there are other ways.  Not every kid learns the same way.  I think if a kid excels at something they should concentrate on that, kinda like how college works.  A kid that can do calculus in 9th grade probably shouldn't have 4 years of English literature.

 

As far as disorders.  It's an epidemic now, but it wasn't when I was in school.  If you yelled out in class or didn't pay attention to the teacher, there were consequences.  Now, you have a disorder and it's ok to do it every day.  Back then the principle spanked you and when you got home your parents dealt with you.  The next day, you didn't do it.

In first grade I recall a problem child being TIED to the chair.  He needed that, and maybe a little more.  But nowadays...!

 

To rephrase something I said earlier regarding Matt's teaching ability:  an individual parent will most likely NOT be as able as a team of teachers to study and know about every subject and be able to teach that to a student.  However, the public teacher is at a disadvantage having two or three DOZEN students at a time, and only a set amount of time to teach. Thus, the public teacher is greatly handicapped in not being able to personalize the lesson.  That leaves the door open for an average parent to actually teach the student more, with less, so to speak.

 

As your teacher friends/family what they think, I'd like to know.

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I have serious issues with public schools. :yes:

And it's all from personal experience. I really do feel I was ripped off out of my education.  :punchteeth 
 

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My wife teaches at a private, Christian school, and we both like the quality/standard of instruction, there.  I feel like it is the best of both worlds.  As long as it stays the course, it is probably the direction that we will go.  Plus, as long as she's there, I think we can get a discount on tuition.  Now, I'm not promoting all private schools, Christian or otherwise, to be the best choice.  I believe it to be much like public schools and homeschooling.  I've seen public schools that are great places to learn and grow, and I've seen those that I would not allow my child to step foot into.  I've also seen homeschoolers that do a phenomenal job, and I've seen those that have been absolutely HORRIBLE and have done a great injustice to their children.


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I was planning on going the Christian school route and then learned that a lot of the "problem" kids from public schools were being moved to the private schools. all parents have a choice and the rights and wrongs all depend on their current situation. I was 28 when my wife quit to stay home with my soon to be 2 kids. we made sacrifices to be able to live on 1 income. Not all people can do that. also, like mike said, there's a whole lot of worthless parents out there whos kids are better off going to a public school. You could debate about this all day and not reach an agreement. You can't fully understand the decision until you have a kid (given you're a good parent). I just hope that all will make their kids education decision with the kids EDUCATION (not sports) in mind.


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Agree mrstrpth.  Also factored in is state law.  Be careful to follow and support the RIGHTS of parents to raise their children, including educating.  In KY we don't have the legal junk that other states have.  A homeschool IS a private school, we only have to tell the local school the name of our school, the names of students, and what grade level they are currently (I think).   We send that notice certified mail. Surprisingly the local school truancy officer sends letters to homeschoolers telling us we are required to answer/fill out forms, even his poorly written questionnaire.  We throw that in the trashcan.  He's about THIS CLOSE to facing some of us during a school board meeting.


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